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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
suppression. our next guest defense the tough voter id law say it is a paramount important that we protect the integrity of the process and make sure voter irregularities and voter fraud is eliminating. joining us now, attorney general of south carolina, great to have you with us.at first, your reaction to what the first lady had to sy. >> i obviously disagree with the first lady.with in every state i looked at, georgia, indiana are two states, section five, one is not a section five states. when they have had laws with a federal id for theoter registration card actually minority that is a went up in subsequent elections and participation.s. lou: when you talk about the five states, those are states because of civil rights transgressions 60 years ago, 50 years ago, they still remain under the watchful eye of the justice department for a revision in their electoral laws or procedures, right?pro >> absolutely. states have asked the federal government permission before they can implement a law thathe affects elections, but in a state passing a law, that she, went up in a state of georgia, up
extreme mental illness with several rights laws is a deeper issue than gun control. >host: how should vice president joe biden and the white house address this. mental illness is part of the debate and will be part of the solution. >> i think they really need to look at civil rights laws and be able to intervene more aggressively with mental health professionals when people show a consistent pattern of mental illness. i think you can travel through any city in america and see massive amounts of people who are not capable of taking care of themselves. as a society, we are not humanitarian when we leave them to defend themselves. >host: this argument is not new. it is highlighted in the extensive report in "the washington post." the chair of the senate judiciary committee, joe biden, we will hear from him. the witness testifies and next to him is sarah brady whose husband was shot during the reagan assassination attempt back in 1981, jim brady. still law was named after him. let's take you back to that hearing -- [video clip] >> life is completely shattered. my daughter's life is completely
in the house so it's got no chance whatsoever of becoming law, end quote. that's what i said back on july 25th. the only reason we ever allowed that vote on that proposal is i said at that time was that we knew it didn't pass constitutional muster. and the democrats were really serious, they would proceed to a revenue bill that originated in the house as the constitution requires and as i called on them to do again last week. to repeat, the so-called nate bill is nothing more than a glorified sense of the senate resolution. so let's put that convenient talking point aside from here on out. last night i told the president we'd be happy to look at whatever he proposes but the truth is we're coming up against a hard deadline here and, as i said, this is a conversation we should have had months ago. and republicans aren't about to write a blank check or anything senate democrats put forward just because we find ourselves at the edge of the cliff. that wouldn't be fair to the american people. that having been said, we'll see what the president has to propose. members on both sides of the aisle will
association any attempt to time the gun laws, to do what even the international association of police chiefs says is a good idea, to ban these military-style assault weapons? will you oppose that? will you continue to oppose that? >> we will continue to oppose a ban on semiautomatic weapons that are used for perfectly legitimate purposes. these aren't military weapons. if we equipped our army with the ar-15 we'd be beaten by every third world-- you know, every third world dictatorship in the country. military weapons fully automatic weapons and that's illegal. you don't get those. that's not what we're talking about. the impression often is, bob, that is what we're talking about, but it isn't. we're talking about sporting arms-- you know the ar-15 is the highest selling-- >> schieffer: how many rounds can these weapons discharge, say, in five seconds? >> well, they fire when you put trigger. >> schieffer: sure and they keep firing. >> just as your shotgun-- not your shotgun bout most shotguns do. >> they don't keep firing. that's a fully automatic weapon. these are not fully automatic weapon
of these people trying to leave the in-laws house. >> rick: we learned the other day that gretchen loves her in-laws. >> gretchen: exactly, because there was a study and the mother-in-law takes the hit. >> rick: there must be a few people who say i can only handle three days of her. i can't go home -- >> gretchen: are you going to help them out. >> rick: you might have to spend four or five days there, get ready. find some way tie a break. there will be really big storms. >> gretchen: let's talk about this morning with an extreme weather alert. deadly storm system that slammed the midwest, snow and tornadoes heading northeast this morning. >> oh, my god, look. that's a tornado. oh, wow. oh, jesus, look at that tornado. >> gretchen: so that tornado spotted in mobile, alabama. am i saying that correctly? >> rick: yeah. mobile. >> gretchen: okay, good. one of the hardest hit cities, tens of thousands of people there waking up the day after christmas now without power. >> when it calmed down, we looked and everything seemed green, like it was popping off transformers left and right. we heard a noise. i
are disenfranchised by new sets of law, but just a decade before two decades before your something like 1500 african-americans serving across the country at various levels is local, state and federal offices. 14 congressmen, two senators, lieutenant governors. it's really powerful. for the kenai tremendous opportunity and promise in the future and so much changes so quickly. it makes me think about her own moment and wonder how fragile is progress. >> when i was at the newberry, i was looking for michelle obama's ancestors. one other thing as kerry says whether i could find out who is the first person in the family to vote. it was a hopeless quest. but i was in the newberry library, a lovely library in chicago and i stumbled across a book that had voter registrations from the 1860s from north carolina. and i look do not book and no jumpers. and i thought it my father, he's from north carolina. otherwise, my great great great grandfather, who in 1867 40 years old, two years free registered to vote. he was approved as a voter.
: but would you be in favor of changing some laws, like, for example, banning these assault weapons? >> i would love to see what comes out of the committee. i think with vice president biden putting together a holistic approach to the challenges we face as a nation, looking at the opportunity we have to seriously address all the issues from mental illness to other issues, understanding what happened and why. after we have those answers we'll be in a much better position to decide the path forward. >> schieffer: let's talk a little bit about the fiscal cliff. you know, the speaker took a deal to the president, and then took it to his own caucus, and he didn't have the votes. he couldn't deliver the votes to guarantee his own proposal. what happens now? >> well, i think it's important for us to note that the house has acted already. the house, we've passed sequestration on four occasion. we've extend all the tax cuts and now we wait for a response from the other side. we stand prepared to be here in washington whenever the president or the senate has a proposal that we can take and act on.
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)